Forrest Fenn Book Club – TTOTC – Ch 14 Looking for Lewis and Clark

Join Shelley Carney and Toby Younis as they discuss Chapter 14 in Forrest Fenn’s first memoir (The Thrill of the Chase); “Looking for Lewis and Clark.”

You can find more of Sean’s work here: https://www.etsy.com/shop/SeanWellsCreates

You can find more of Jason’s work here: https://www.etsy.com/shop/Tintero

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Yellowstone Pamphlet, Published in 1958

For those searchers considering the possibility that Fenn hid his treasure in Yellowtone, here’s a pamphlet you might find interesting. It was provided to us by one of our YouTube Channel subscribers in the UK, Jonothan (Jono) Jones. Click on the image below to download the .pdf file he sent us.



For a different take on the search for the treasure Forrest Fenn somewhere in the mountains north of Santa Fe, please visit our YouTube Channel.

The Search for Forrest Fenn’s Treasure Isn’t About Forrest Fenn Anymore

Join Shelley Carney and Toby Younis as they discuss an inflection point in the search for the treasure Forrest Fenn hid somewhere in the mountains north of Santa Fe.

You can find more of Sean’s work here: https://www.etsy.com/shop/SeanWellsCreates

You can find more of Jason’s work here:  https://www.etsy.com/shop/Tintero

Please click on the following link to subscribe to our YouTube Channel: http://agypsyskiss.tv

Once you’ve subscribed, click on the bell in the upper right hand corner to enable notifications. With that, you’ll receive a text or email letting you know when one of our live streams has started.


 

Memorial Day, 2018


Memorial Day

On this Memorial Day, we remember the fallen – the men and women, fathers and mothers, sons and daughters, brothers and sisters who have sacrificed their lives defending our democracy, our Constitution, our freedom and our way of life. Take a moment today, in the midst of all the other activities, and contemplate their sacrifice. May they all rest in peace – especially my brothers, “Buddy” Boland, “Dan” Danovich and đại úy Ngo Van Lu.

National Moment of Remembrance

The “National Moment of Remembrance” resolution was passed on Dec 2000 which asks that at 3 p.m. local time, for all Americans “To voluntarily and informally observe in their own way a Moment of remembrance and respect, pausing from whatever they are doing for a moment of silence or listening to ‘Taps.”

My Grandma Delgado’s Recipe for Bannock Bread

Introduction

This bannock bread recipe is mostly for myself. I want to make certain I can remember it, and maybe, even share it with my children and grandchildren.

The Delgado side of my family were famous for their skills in the kitchen. My Aunt Lucy made a living as a cook (“I’m a cook, not a chef,” she’d tell people, “Chefs don’t cook New Mexican.”) My mother is at least partly responsible for my body shape. But, my Grandma Delgado? She was so good that she made everything in the kitchen look easy. She was an Espinoza by birth, from up Abiquiú way, and likely responsible for some of the Native American DNA in my blood. Which is why I trust this recipe for bannock bread.

One day, she got tired enough of me asking her to rustle up a batch of “banna-bread” that she showed me how to do it myself. This is the recipe I recall and have been using it at home and in the field ever since. The “at home” version is much easier, because I have the help of a Kitchen Aide mixer and an oven I can set to an exact temperature. But, with a little little extra effort and a watchful eye in the field, this recipe works just as well.

This should serve two big men at breakfast, or four, if you’re lunching in polite company.

Grandma’s Bannock Bread Recipe

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups of flour. You can use anything except self rising.  I prefer whole wheat.
  • 1 teaspoon of baking powder for each cup of flour.
  • 1/2 teaspoon of salt for each cup of flour.
  • 1 cup of lukewarm water. You’ll make your life easier if you add a Tablespoon of oil to the water. Unless it’s motor oil.

Pour the dry ingredients into a bowl, and stir them until you feel like they’re pretty well mixed. At this point, you can add anything you want. I’ve made it with a couple of shakes of Italian Seasoning, raisins, a little sugar and cinnamon, dried cranberries, diced fresh apple, and diced ham.

Stir the liquid in a little at a time. You’ll end up using almost all of it. If you over-wet it, just add a little more flour.

You’re looking to form what I call, “thingees that are trying to crawl up your spoon.”

At that point, scrape the spoon into the bowl, and use your hands. Form it into a ball, then put it back in the bowl and knead it for at least five minutes. Ten is even better.

Form it into a ball again, and let it sit in the bowl in a warm, dry place for about ten minutes.

As you can see in the photo above, I bake it on a cookie sheet with a layer of parchment paper. It won’t stick to the paper.

I bake it on the middle rack of my oven for 20 minutes. You may have to run a test or two for your oven. But, if you keep an eye on it, you should be fine. It’s ready when you can tap it with a finger, and the crust is hard, and it sounds kind of hollow.

Let it rest on a cooling rack for about ten minutes to finish the baking. Then, break off a piece, spread some butter or fresh strawberry jam on it, and enjoy.

Outroduction

If you’re out in the field, you can bake it in a dutch oven, or your own makeshift camp oven. Or, like many Native Americans, you can fry it in a pan with a little oil. Just remember to flip it when the bottom browns up.

If you’re looking for pure nutrition, this isn’t the recipe for you. Bannock is about calories from carbohydrates to keep you going when you’re out in the field. Make a batch the night before you leave for a recon trip, and it will keep you from getting “hangry” throughout the day.



For a different take on the search for the treasure Forrest Fenn hid somewhere in the mountains north of Santa Fe, please visit our YouTube Channel. Thank you.

Just the FAQs: If you found Forrest Fenn’s treasure, would you sell it?

Join us as Shelley Carney asks Toby Younis, “If you found the treasure, and someone wanted to buy it from you, would you sell it?

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The Universal Fenn: The Temporal Component in Forrest Fenn’s Treasure Poem


Introduction

Although the Universe, in its grand scale, is not concerned with, nor does it measure its existence in time – we do, and, so does Forrest Fenn.

Fenn is very much a creature of time. He’s documented the past in his books. He lives in the present – his present, being from 2010 to today. And, the future, especially in the sense of how he contemplates, or perhaps, even desires, it to be.

Many times, when he speaks, or when he writes, he considers time in an approving way, rather than being fearful of it, as perhaps we would expect an elderly man to be. Fenn is not only at peace with time, he respects, and perhaps even admires it.

Therefore, isn’t it possible, Fenn has incorporated the temporal in his treasure poem?

Imagine Time in The Poem

There are at least two lines in Fenn’s poem, that, to us, are temporal.

The first is, “And take it in the canyon down, not far, but too far to walk.” We shall reserve the discussion of that riddle for a later article.

The second is, “If you’ve been wise and found the blaze…”

How wise would one have to be to find the blaze? Perhaps wise enough to consider the temporal component?

What We Imagine

Assumption: Fenn hid the treasure around his birthday, August 22 – a date closer to the Autumn Equinox than it is to the Summer Solstice.

Fact: There are 24 lines in the poem, (assumption) each representing an hour of the day, beginning at Quad Zulu, or midnight.

Fact: “If you’ve been wise and found the blaze…” is the 13th line in the poem, (assumption) representing 1300 on a 24-hour clock (1pm).

Hypothesis: Fenn hid the treasure in a location where the combination of the sun and the local topography create the blaze – a temporary one requiring a searcher to be at the precise location at the precise moment the blaze appears – thus requiring wisdom.

Where do you want to be at 1pm on August 22?


For a different take on the search for the treasure Forrest Fenn hid somewhere in the mountains north of Santa Fe, please visit our YouTube Channel. Thank you.

 

Forrest Fenn Book Club – TTOTC – Ch 13 The Long Ride Home

Join Shelley Carney and Toby Younis as they discuss Chapter 13 in Forrest Fenn’s first memoir (The Thrill of the Chase); “The Long Ride Home.”

You can find more of Sean’s work here: https://www.etsy.com/shop/SeanWellsCreates

You can find more of Jason’s work here: https://www.etsy.com/shop/Tintero

Please click on the following link to subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://agypsyskiss.tv

Once you’ve subscribed, click on the bell in the upper right hand corner to enable notifications. With that, you’ll receive a text or email letting you know when one of our live streams has started.

Please click on the following link to make a small donation so we can continue to deliver quality content: PayPal.me/agypsyskiss/ Thank you!


AGK Panel: What does your gut tell you about this season? With filmmaker Marshall Moyle

Join guest searcher Marshall Moyle, panelists Sean Dodson, Richard McDonald and Jason Younis, along with producer Shelley Carney and moderator Toby Younis as they discuss “What does your gut tell you about this years’ search season?”

You can find more of Sean’s work here: https://www.etsy.com/shop/SeanWellsCreates

You can find more of Jason’s work here: https://www.etsy.com/shop/Tintero

Please click on the following link to subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://agypsyskiss.tv

Once you’ve subscribed, click on the bell in the upper right hand corner to enable notifications. With that, you’ll receive a text or email letting you know when one of our live streams has started.


Enough Time and Enough Technology and Fenn’s Treasure Will Be Found


Headline: CBS News, May 23, 2018:

Robot sub finds ‘holy grail of shipwrecks’ with treasure worth billions.*

Click on the image above to read the article.

You’ll find that a research team from the Wood’s Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts, was using an miniature, unmanned submarine to map the ocean floor with cameras recording all along the light spectrum, including visible, thermal and infra red, and stumbled on a treasure of a lifetime.

As I have stated in the past, when it comes to hunting for treasure – any treasure – the application of technology increases the odds in your favor.

For a different take on the hunt for the treasure Forrest Fenn hid somewhere in the mountains north of Santa Fe, check out our YouTube channel.

*Special thanks to Fenn Treasure hunter Eric Schmidt for sharing the link with us.