How far could a dying man have traveled to hide his treasure? (Yes. Fenn’s treasure is in New Mexico.)

Join Shelley Carney and Toby Younis as they provide yet another reason why the treasure Forrest Fenn hid somewhere in the mountains North of Santa Fe is in New Mexico.



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12 thoughts on “How far could a dying man have traveled to hide his treasure? (Yes. Fenn’s treasure is in New Mexico.)

  1. Hello,
    Shelley, I think your idea here is very logical and well thought out. I do wonder about one thing: Someone who would take a chest of gold and jewels into the wilderness and die next to it sounds to me like a person who is thinking only about himself and his wealth. Based on what I’ve learned, I don’t believe Forrest was that kind of person. If he did go through with it, this is how it would probably have played out: After it was realized that he was missing, a search would be mounted, his car finally found, and soon after, his body (imagine what condition it would be in). Imagine the effect this would have on his beloved wife, family and friends. I don’t think this is the legacy Forrest would want to leave. Rather, I believe he may have fantasized about doing this while he was sick. What’s more, as a fantasy, the distance to his special place wouldn’t be limited by his very real waning strength. I doubt that he ever seriously planned to go through with it. Only after he recovered did the idea reemerge and morph into the amazing treasure hunt we know today. The story he tells about his plan being “spoiled” by him getting well is, I believe, a well crafted story by a master story teller.

    • Our next program is entitled “The Art of Confirmation Bias.” We would like your permission to use your above comment as an example, without, of course, using your name. Thank you. Shelley.

      • Sure, no problem! I guess it’s hard NOT to let our biases influence our opinions and decision-making. Allen

      • LOL. True. Toby always tells me: the scientific method exists for a reason! Shelly.

      • Shelley,
        In spite of my comment above, I’m still fairly confident that you are correct that the treasure is in NM. You had me at “where warm waters halt” and “somewhere in the mountains north of Sante Fe”.
        Also, it recently occured to me that this story of Fenn’s about hiding the chest and throwing himself down on it and dying could very well be a hint/clue that says: “Don’t go where a terminally ill cancer patient couldn’t go.” (i.e. not too far from Sante Fe!)
        Allen

      • Allen…It’s inescapable, isn’t it. Toby would like to use your comment above as an intro to his panel tonight. OK? Shelley

  2. Hi Shelley,

    I really liked your analysis on how far a dying man could travel. And I agree with the other searchers. You should do more videos. You are thoughtful and concise. Really enjoyed it!

    So, oh boy! here is comes. Someone suggested there might be a little bias in towards N.M. in your analysis and You and Toby pushed back pretty good on that. Referencing the facts, and evidence, and actionable line of defense.

    But, in the end, “bias recognizes bias”. Here is an example of what I mean. I know another man who contracted cancer while was in his early 80s. This was in the same decade (1980s) and that man chose to go to Yellowstone and fish in fast moving streams even though his family was in Texas and New Mexico.

    I’m sure you know who I am referring to.

    So I think, it’s easy to find facts that support an idea but also, equally easy to find facts that don’t if your willing to look.

    But, I really did enjoy your video. I learned a lot and I hope you do more.

    Warm regards,

    Jeff

    • Our next program is entitled “The Art of Confirmation Bias.” We would like your permission to use your above comment as an example, without, of course using your name. Thank you. Shelley.

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