Understanding Where Warm Waters Halt in New Mexico (Updated on June 22, 2018)

I have assumed that the Fenn’s treasure chest is hidden in New Mexico. I’ve explained why in an earlier entry. While that decision could be criticized, it cannot be debated. It’s my assumption, and I cling to it like a grizzly bear does to a chubby, tasty flatlander.

I have also assumed that “warm waters” as used in the first clue of Fenn’s Poem (Begin it where warm waters halt…) is Fenn’s gracious, poetic, and pretty damned transparent nod to the the New Mexico State Game and Fish Department Fishing Rules and Information pamphlet. He is, after all, a lifelong, devout and dedicated fisherman, and would be familiar with them.

When I first started searching for the treasure Forrest Fenn hid somewhere in the mountains north of Santa Fe, like everyone else, I used Google search to help me. At that time, when I searched “warm waters” the first entry on the results list was the reference to the phrase “warm waters” in the New Mexico Fishing Regulations. Perform the same search today, and you’ll get everything that has been written since. By anyone.

Since I’m about to jump into them, you can download a copy (in Adobe Acrobat) format of the 2018-2019 Fishing Proclamation (as the Rules are referred to) here. (I update this information annually.)

First, the phrase “warm waters,” (the plural) in the context of fishing, is unique to New Mexico. No other Rocky Mountain state uses the phrase in the context of fishing.

Second, while it is common knowledge that trout thrive in waters just either side of 55 degrees, there is nothing in anything the NMG&FD publishes that defines hot, warm, cool or cold waters in terms of temperatures in degrees Fahrenheit or Celsius. You will, on the other hand, find lists, with appropriate images, of warm water species and cold water species on the NMG&FD website without any reference to water temperatures.

CaptureaThird, you can find the definition of warm waters on page 16 of the above referred to publication. In the first paragraph it says, “Warm waters include all streams, lakes, and ponds, except those designated as trout waters (pages 24–25, 31).

Thus, the distinction, in the context of New Mexico fishing, is not between warm waters and cool waters, or warm water species and cool water species. It’s between warm waters and Trout Waters, irrespective of temperature or specie. (Special Trout Waters are a subset of Trout Waters, and reside within them._

The following has been edited (on June 22, 2018) to correct our understanding of warm waters in New Mexico.

That difference is documented in the map below. Click on the map to enlarge. A copy of this map is included in the annual New Mexico Fishing Rules and Info pamphlet. <===== You can download the current pamphlet with the link.

Simply put, warm waters in New Mexico are in the white areas of the map, and trout waters in the pink areas. Warm waters halt at the transition points between the two. For even more detail you can download this map:

New-Mexico-Public-Fishing-Waters-Map-Higher-Quality (1)

 

Understanding “Water” in Forrest Fenn’s Treasure Poem

Join Shelley Carney and Toby Younis of A Gypsy’s Kiss on Live Stream and Live Chat to discuss “water,” one of the three most often used words in Forrest Fenn’s treasure book, The Thrill of the Chase.”


Another Search Season Ends. Fenn’s Treasure Remains Hidden.


As of this writing, November, 2017 is drawing nigh.

Counting a short one in 2010, that makes eight seasons under searcher’s respective belts (including 5 for me) with nothing to show for it.

Well, not exactly nothing.

To me, the distance between reality and fantasy in the forums is not only greater, but increasing at a far more rapid pace, as the combination of frustration and the evolution of interpretation and argument is ever more exaggerated. In some ways, they are helpful to Fenn’s goal of the treasure remaining hidden for at least a thousand years.

I can write without equivocation:

  • Fenn is not providing the community, any of them, especially “certain individuals,” additional hints or clues.
  • Nothing Fenn has said or written since the first edition of his “Thrill of the Chase” in 2010 has helped any searcher get closer to the treasure he hid.
  • No one has been closer than 200 feet to the treasure – and knew they were closer than 200 feet – a quote Fenn still used as recently as May, 2017.
  • There is zero in the way of evidence that any searcher has correctly decoded what are the meanings of “warm waters,” “home of Brown,” “no place for the meek,” and “the blaze.”
  • There is zero in the way of evidence that the treasure is hidden North of the border between New Mexico and Colorado.
  • To me, Fenn is tired of the “Chase,” realizing he significantly underestimated the number of interested parties, and the size of the population he once referred to as “the 7%.”

Here’s the good news: it’s still out there, and we have at least six months to plan our 2018 campaign, comfortable in the knowledge that no one else is any closer than we. Although, based on what I read in the forums, thousands are farther away.

Good luck in your search.

Photo Album: 2017 Cimarron Recon

Photo Gallery – Forrest Fenn’s Poem: When and Where Warm Waters Halt

Please note: use these images while watching our YouTube video: “Forrest Fenn’s Poem: When and Where Warm Waters Halt”



Breaking News: Fenn Issues Awaited Safety Advisory

By Forrest Fenn, June 29, 2017

“When I said the treasure was not hidden in Utah or Idaho it was my plan not to narrow the search area further. But in the light of a recent accident, and in the interest of safety, I feel it necessary to alter that plan.

“The treasure chest is not under water, nor is it near the Rio Grande River. It is not necessary to move large rocks or climb up or down a steep precipice, and it is not under a man-made object.

“Please remember that I was about 80 when I made two trips from my vehicle to where I hid the treasure.

“Please be cautious and don’t take risks.

My guess is that in the last 7 years more than 250,000 people have searched for the treasure without suffering any serious injuries. I invite you to add your name to that list. The search is supposed to be fun.”

Long, Lost Interview in Which Fenn Tells Us What the First Clue Is!

Radio New Zealand, Jesse Mulligan, 03 Apr 2013, Interview with Forrest Fenn, entitled “Treasure hunt.” Listen to the whole thing, but note Fenn’s comment on the first clue at 9:30. Whatever debate there was, should now end.

Click here to play the recording.